James Paul Norrie (1891 – 1945)

Known by his contemporaries as “the man who made the Malartics”, James Paul Norrie combined ambition, energy, instinct and an extraordinary entrepreneurial spirit to discover and open mines in the Abitibi region of northwestern Quebec, including Perron, East Malartic and Malartic Goldfields, to name but a few.

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Roland Kenneth Kilborn (1902 – 1959)

Canada’s enviable reputation for engineering excellence owes much to Roland Kilborn, whose vision, technical skills and entrepreneurial spirit led to the founding of one of the nation’s foremost engineering consulting companies.

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Robert John Isaacs (1905 – 1997)

Robert Isaacs is best-known for his role in the discovery and development of the massive lead-zinc deposits in New Brunswick that became the cornerstone of Brunswick Mining and Smelting. A talented mining engineer, he also had a hand in financing and developing many smaller producers, particularly in Newfoundland, where he developed a reputation for building mines with low capital and operating costs.

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William Guy Brissenden (1915 – 2012)

A hands-on approach to problem-solving, forged in both war and peace, enabled William Guy Brissenden to master repeated challenges during a lengthy career spent mostly with Noranda. His extraordinary skills surfaced as a member of the management team that successfully developed Gaspé Copper’s mine, mill and smelter at Murdochville, Quebec.

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Richard Geren (1917 – 2002)

Richard Geren has been aptly described as a man with mining in his blood, mind and soul. As a geologist working with Labrador Mining and Exploration, he was a key member of a team that delineated high-grade iron ore in the Knob Lake area of northeastern Quebec.

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Richard J. Ennis (1881 – 1951)

Dick Ennis was among a select number of larger-than-life personalities that appeared in the early days of the twentieth century when an explosion of mineral discoveries launched Canadian mining on a wave of unprecedented growth.

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Michael J. Knuckey (b. 1936)

Michael J. Knuckey’s induction into the Canadian Mining Hall of Fame recognizes his leadership role in the discovery or development of at least 10 mineral deposits, of which two are truly world class. Of these deposits, eight have become mines.

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Edgar A. Scholz (1915 – 1980)

Edgar A. Scholz was one of the pioneers in applying large-scale open pit mining methods to low-grade copper, molybdenum and gold deposits.

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W. Austin McVeigh (1882 – 1975)

W. Austin McVeigh was one of ten children born to farmers working the land on Grand Calumet Island, Quebec, near Ottawa. It was here he developed his love of the outdoors and dreamed of the riches being discovered in places such as Cripple Creek, Colorado, and Cobalt, Ontario.

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Harry L. Roscoe (1885 – 1963)

Harry L. Roscoe - “Bill” to an army of friends and industry colleagues - contributed to the advancement and prestige of the mining industry in many ways over many years, but is best known for forging development of a Canadian mining enterprise with global reach and influence.

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