Ernest Craig (1888 – 1960)

Ernest Craig was the first General Manager of Falconbridge Nickel Mines, building a mine and a townsite in the late 1920s that became the foundation for the international powerhouse that now operates under the Xstrata banner.

Share
Roman Shklanka (b. 1932)

Roman Shklanka has strengthened the prestige of Canada’s mining industry through his geological expertise and willingness to consider potential growth opportunities in diverse settings around the world.

Share
John T. Williamson (1907 – 1958)

Canada’s recent emergence as a centre of excellence for diamond exploration and production owes much to the pioneering efforts of John Williamson, a brilliant geologist from McGill University who discovered, built and operated the highly successful Williamson diamond mine - also known as Mwadui - in Tanganyika (now Tanzania).

Share
James C. O’Rourke (b. 1939)

James O’Rourke began his career as a mining engineer working on a new generation of mines being developed by visionary industry leaders during the expansionary post-war decades. This rare experience set the stage for a successful career as a mine-maker, company builder and advocate of progressive industry partnerships.

Share
John (Jack) F. McOuat (1933 – 2013)

John (Jack) McOuat helped advance hundreds of mines and mineral projects around the world as a founding partner of Watts, Griffis and McOuat (WGM), Canada’s longest-running independent firm of geological and mining consultants.

Share
Louis Gignac (b. 1950)

Louis Gignac contributed to the stature of Canada’s mining industry during his exemplary career as a company builder, mine operator and developer, and advocate of industry best practices. He is best known for building Quebec-based Cambior into an intermediate gold producer and mentoring a new generation of mining talent.

Share
Murray E. Watts (1909 – 1982)

Murray Edmund Watts, a combination of adventurous prospector and mining engineer, is probably best known for his work in the Arctic, where he made a number of major ore discoveries, revealing much about that vast land inside Canada’s Arctic Circle.

Share
Karl Springer (1899 – 1991)

Karl Springer, a highly successful mine-finder, has amply proved in his career as a prospector that not only could he find the mines but that he could provide the inspirational leadership and drive to make them pay. As well, he has done pioneer work, particularly with the helicopter, in the use of aviation in exploration and mine development.

Share
H. H. “Spud” Huestis (1907 – 1979)

The claim to Canadian mining immortality for Herman H. “Spud” Huestis came with his introduction to the world of the large tonnage, low-cost Highland Valley copper deposits in British Columbia, several hundred miles northeast of Vancouver.

Share
Frederick M. Connell (1883 – 1980)

Frederick M. Connell The citation accompanying the 1973 Inco Medal award to Frederick M. Connell, probably said it all: “In recognition of the leading part he has played as a mine-finder and mine-maker, placing his name in the foremost rank of those whose names and accomplishments will always be associated with laying broad and firm foundations to one of Canada’s greatest industries.”

Share