Georges H. Dumont (1911 – 1999)

Mining engineer and geologist Georges H. Dumont has truly earned his place among the great contemporary discoverers. A pioneer of the Quebec mining industry, Dumont was actively involved in the engineering, development and production of the eleven mineral deposits he helped discover.

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Archibald M. Bell  (1906 – 1991)

Archibald Bell contributed to the development of several mines during the course of an illustrious career that epitomizes the progress made by the mining industry this century. He is best known for his role in the discovery of the Copper and Needle Mountain orebodies of Gaspe Copper which, at 67 million tons averaging 1.3% copper, could be termed an “elephant” discovery.

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William H. Wright (1876 – 1951)

From the discovery of the famous Kirkland Lake Break that hosted seven producing gold mines, to the launch of The Globe and Mail newspaper, William Wright has played an important role in Canadian business history. The Wright Hargreaves mine was one of the largest in the Kirkland Lake camp, turning out almost five million ounces of gold, and its profits were used to build a major mining company with interests across Canada.

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Noah A. Timmins (1867 – 1936)

Recognized as the leader of a group of five men who invested their energies and resources in founding first the LaRose silver mine in Cobalt and later the Hollinger gold mine in Timmins, Noah Timmins is unquestionably a founding father of this country’s mining industry.

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Paul Penna (1922 – 1996)

Paul Penna was a successful mine maker and the builder of a substantial corporation destined to thrive long into the future. As chairman and president of Agnico Eagle Mines, he brought his company from small beginnings to senior status.

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Edmund Horne (1865 – 1952)

Along with many other prospectors of his generation, Edmund Horne came to northern Ontario at the turn of the century with hopes of finding his pot of gold. Success was elusive, but rather than give up, Horne decided to venture across the border into Quebec, based on his belief that good geology did not stop at the Ontario border.

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Robert E. Hallbauer (1930 – 1995)

For almost three decades the 1970s, 1980s and until his death in 1995 Robert Hallbauer was recognized by industry, government and labor as a giant in terms of his presence and influence over the mining industry in British Columbia.

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Joseph Burr Tyrrell (1858 – 1957)

Joseph Tyrrell has been variously described as the doyen of Canadian mining men, the dean of mining, the man who conquered the Canadian North, Canada’s senior geologist, and the last of the great breed of map­making explorers and first of the modern mineral­finders and technologists.

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Alfred Powis (1930 – 2007)

Alfred Powis is a company builder with exceptional leadership skills and a keen eye for opportunity. During his tenure as chief executive officer at Noranda, he was instrumental in creating one of the largest natural resource conglomerates in Canada, with few rivals internationally.

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Stephen P. Ogryzlo (1911 – 2000)

Few mining men have made as many and as varied contributions to the industry as Stephen Ogryzlo. A globe-trotter long before it became fashionable, Ogryzlo’s accomplishments are legion. He explored and outlined, in a joint-venture with Freeport Sulphur, major nickel laterite deposits in Indonesia. He recognized and proved up significant, open-pit asbestos deposits at Black Lake, Quebec.

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