John E. Hammell (1876 – 1958)

The initiative of Jack Hammell to harness the potential of the airplane opened the floodgates to mineral exploration in Canada’s north. It was Hammell’s ambition to “crack open the north,” and he did that through his pioneering use of aircraft to move men and materials to areas previously accessible only by dogsled in winter or canoe in summer.

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Oliver Hall (1879 – 1954)

Oliver Hall joined Noranda Inc. almost at its inception, responsible for both mine operations and exploration. His foresight and economic sense promoted the company’s rapid growth in the 1930s and 1940s to become one of the country’s greatest mining concerns.

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Professor Herbert Haultain (1869 – 1962)

While every graduate engineer is familiar with the Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer, there may be a few who do not know that the ritual dates back to 1922 and a certain Professor Herbert Edward Terrick Haultain. In a talk he gave that year, Professor Haultain recommended developing an oath or creed for graduating engineers.

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Edmund Horne (1865 – 1952)

Along with many other prospectors of his generation, Edmund Horne came to northern Ontario at the turn of the century with hopes of finding his pot of gold. Success was elusive, but rather than give up, Horne decided to venture across the border into Quebec, based on his belief that good geology did not stop at the Ontario border.

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Donald MacDonald Hogarth  (1878 – 1950)

Although best known as one of Canada’s prominent mine financiers and developers, Donald Hogarth’s career includes a long list of achievements in politics, wartime military service, and other business interests.

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Joseph H. Hirshhorn (1900 – 1981)

Joseph Hirshhorn came to Canada in 1933, drawn by opportunities in gold mining. He was an unabashed promoter and entrepreneur who announced his arrival with a full page advertisement in The Northern Miner, entitled “My Name is Opportunity and I Am Paging Canada.”

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Robert E. Hallbauer (1930 – 1995)

For almost three decades the 1970s, 1980s and until his death in 1995 Robert Hallbauer was recognized by industry, government and labor as a giant in terms of his presence and influence over the mining industry in British Columbia.

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Walter Holyk (1921 – 2004)

An enquiring mind, skill as a field geologist and the desire to find orebodies led Walter Holyk to make an outstanding contribution to the understanding of the genesis of volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits.

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Gerald G. Hatch (1922 – 2014)

Described justly as “a national asset”, Gerald Hatch has been honoured numerous times for his outstanding contributions to the advancement of process metallurgy and his leadership in multi-discipline consulting services. His world-renowned engineering firm, Hatch Associates, has successfully guided many metallurgical projects through the critical stages of research, development and production.

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James Merritt Harrison (1915 – 1990)

Like Sir William Logan before him, James Merritt Harrison was the right man in the right place at the right time. During his 17-year tenure with the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), the scientific organization enjoyed one of the most successful periods of its venerable history.

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