Hector Authier (1881 – 1971)

In a life span of 89 years, Hector Authier drank deeply from the cup of Canadian life and enriched his country in the process. All Abitibi was his cause and Val d’Or one of the effects.

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Selwyn Gwillym Blaylock (1879 – 1945)

Selwyn G. Blaylock devoted a working lifetime to mines and minerals and left a number of monuments to his effectiveness including: A successful Canadian mining and metallurgical enterprise, Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada, moving upward in this organization from assayer in 1899 to president and managing director in 1939.

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John Ross Bradfield (1899 – 1983)

So diverse were the achievements of John Bradfield that he can well be characterized as a coach who built a winning team capable of excellent performance on more than one type of playing field.

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Eldon Leslie Brown (1990 – 1998)

Mining on Canada’s northern frontier poses a particular set of challenges and few mining men had more successful experience with them than Eldon Leslie Brown. The operations he managed during his career - Sherritt, God’s Lake, Sachigo River, Lynn Lake - all had their Beginnings in remote, northern areas supplied and developed by tractor trains on winter roads and the bush pilots who appeared after World War I.

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William Fleming James  (1900 – 1949)

Prominently displayed in the halls of St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, is a plaque that reads:“GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY FRIENDS OF DR. W.F. JAMES, SAINT FRANCIS XAVIER UNIVERSITY ON 12 MARCH 1980..."

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Norman Bell Keevil (1910 – 1989)

To win acclaim in one lifetime either as a prospector, a scientist, a mine maker or a corporate builder is no small achievement; each occupation requires a high degree of talent, competence and energy. These three qualities Norman Keevil possessed and employed in abundance as indicated by the act that he achieved preeminence in all four endeavors.

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Alex Mosher (1900 – 1993)

Since the turn of the century, the mining prospector has been a romantic figure in Canadian folklore. Justifiably so, because it has usually been the prospector who has triggered the metamorphosis of idle wilderness ground into a wealth-producing production centre providing the necessities of life for many in the mining community and opportunity on a far-reaching scale, to industrial operations across Canada.

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Robert Crooks Stanley (1876 – 1951)

Robert C. Stanley was the driving force that built Inco into the largest nickel company in the world and one of the world’s most successful mining and metallurgical enterprises. Sudbury, Ontario, with a complex developed around eight mines, and Thompson, Manitoba, with it's large mining and processing complex, are two of a number of communities whose fortunes have gone hand in hand with those of Inco.

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