Donald A. McLeod (1928 – 2017)

Donald McLeod was a revered and iconic figure in Canada’s mining industry and an inspirational role model for young mining entrepreneurs. Born and raised in Stewart, BC, he began his career as a pack-horse operator and miner’s helper in the 1940s, and went on to become a successful mine finder, developer, and founder of the Vancouver-based Northair Group of Companies.

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Stewart L. Blusson (b. 1938)

Few events in mining history have generated as much excitement or public attention as the Lac de Gras diamond discoveries in Canada’s North during the early 1990s. Stewart (Stu) Blusson was an intellectual catalyst for this transformative event, which led to development of Ekati, Canada’s first diamond mine, and other significant discoveries.

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Viola R. MacMillan (1903 – 1993)

Viola MacMillan had two careers in the Canadian mining industry. First, over a period that spanned four decades, she and her husband teamed up as prospectors and developers of several substantial mineral deposits across the country.

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Albert A. Koffman (1910 – 1983)

During a 45-year career in mining, Albert Koffman’s efforts led to the discovery of 13 base metal mines including the discovery and development of a new mining district in Manitoba.

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Neil Campbell (1914 – 1978)

Neil Campbell’s abilities at geological deduction were responsible for several important mineral discoveries, but it is the Pine Point mine on the south shore of Great Slave Lake in the Northwest Territories with which he was most closely associated.

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Robert William Boyle (1920 – 2003)

Robert Boyle grew up in southwestern Ontario, where he developed his fascination with and love for science and the natural world. He went on to make many contributions to the mining industry; however the most important was his pioneering work in geochemistry.

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Charles E. Michener (1907 – 2004)

An imaginative exploration philosophy, sound academic approach and the resolute perseverance of a risk taker - these were the qualities that made Charles E. Michener a major factor in the success of Inco Ltd.‘s mine-finding endeavours during the middle decades of this century.

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Professor Herbert Haultain (1869 – 1962)

While every graduate engineer is familiar with the Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer, there may be a few who do not know that the ritual dates back to 1922 and a certain Professor Herbert Edward Terrick Haultain. In a talk he gave that year, Professor Haultain recommended developing an oath or creed for graduating engineers.

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Bernard O. Brynelsen (1911 – 2004)

Long before the Brenda mine was developed into a world-class copper producer, the low-grade Okanagan area deposit was scoffed at by many in the industry. Bernard Brynelsen, however, was not among the sceptics.

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Sir Harry Oakes (1874 – 1943)

Adventure, fame and fortune all came the way of Sir Harry Oakes, the self-made prospector and mine-finder who transformed Ontario’s Kirkland Lake district into one of the world’s most famous gold camps.

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