Eldon Leslie Brown (1900 – 1998)

Mining on Canada’s northern frontier poses a particular set of challenges and few mining men had more successful experience with them than Eldon Leslie Brown. The operations he managed during his career - Sherritt, God’s Lake, Sachigo River, Lynn Lake - all had their Beginnings in remote, northern areas supplied and developed by tractor trains on winter roads and the bush pilots who appeared after World War I.

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John Ross Bradfield (1899 – 1983)

So diverse were the achievements of John Bradfield that he can well be characterized as a coach who built a winning team capable of excellent performance on more than one type of playing field.

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Richard (1892 – 1972) and Norman C. (1889 -1967) Pearce

They never discovered a single showing or hoisted a ton of ore, but Norman and Richard Pearce chronicled the burgeoning Canadian mining industry in the pages of The Northern Miner weekly newspaper for more than 50 years, holding it accountable and helping mold into one of the most open industries in the country.

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Viola R. MacMillan (1903 – 1993)

Viola MacMillan had two careers in the Canadian mining industry. First, over a period that spanned four decades, she and her husband teamed up as prospectors and developers of several substantial mineral deposits across the country.

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John E. Hammell (1876 – 1958)

The initiative of Jack Hammell to harness the potential of the airplane opened the floodgates to mineral exploration in Canada’s north. It was Hammell’s ambition to “crack open the north,” and he did that through his pioneering use of aircraft to move men and materials to areas previously accessible only by dogsled in winter or canoe in summer.

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Randolph W. Diamond  (1891 – 1978)

The metallurgical magic of Randolph Diamond transformed British Columbia’s Sullivan mine from a unique but uneconomic mineral deposit into Canada’s most productive zinc-lead producer and catapulted Cominco Ltd. into the forefront of Canadian mining companies.

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Arthur W. White (1911 – 1992)

Arthur White was an active mine financier who, with his partner, raised millions of dollars for more than 50 companies and was instrumental in developing several mines including two of the most prolific producers in Ontario’s Red Lake gold camp - the Campbell mine and its neighbour, which bears his name, the Arthur W. White mine.

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Oliver Hall (1879 – 1954)

Oliver Hall joined Noranda Inc. almost at its inception, responsible for both mine operations and exploration. His foresight and economic sense promoted the company’s rapid growth in the 1930s and 1940s to become one of the country’s greatest mining concerns.

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James Roycroft Gordon (1898 – 1980)

James Roycroft Gordon enjoyed a long and illustrious career with Inco Ltd., rising through the ranks to become the company’s first Canadian-born president.

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Matthew James Boylen (1907 – 1970)

Sometimes referred to as “the King of the Minemakers” at the height of his career, James Boylen was best known for the discovery and development of the volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits in the Bathurst area of New Brunswick in the early 1950s.

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