William S. (Steve) Vaughan (b. 1937)

William S. (Steve) Vaughan helped elevate the stature of Canada’s mining industry at home and abroad as a leading expert and advisor on natural resource law, project finance and mineral policy matters for more than 40 years.

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James E.C. Carter (b. 1950)

James Carter is a giant in the history of Canada’s oil sands and an exemplary leader in their sustainable development. He transformed the fledgling industry — and the frontier town of Fort McMurray, Alberta — into a powerful economic engine for the nation while building Syncrude Canada into one of the world’s largest and most successful energy producers.

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Eldon Leslie Brown (1900 – 1998)

Mining on Canada’s northern frontier poses a particular set of challenges and few mining men had more successful experience with them than Eldon Leslie Brown. The operations he managed during his career - Sherritt, God’s Lake, Sachigo River, Lynn Lake - all had their Beginnings in remote, northern areas supplied and developed by tractor trains on winter roads and the bush pilots who appeared after World War I.

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John Ross Bradfield (1899 – 1983)

So diverse were the achievements of John Bradfield that he can well be characterized as a coach who built a winning team capable of excellent performance on more than one type of playing field.

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Selwyn Gwillym Blaylock (1879 – 1945)

Selwyn G. Blaylock devoted a working lifetime to mines and minerals and left a number of monuments to his effectiveness including: A successful Canadian mining and metallurgical enterprise, Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada, moving upward in this organization from assayer in 1899 to president and managing director in 1939.

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Hector Authier (1881 – 1971)

In a life span of 89 years, Hector Authier drank deeply from the cup of Canadian life and enriched his country in the process. All Abitibi was his cause and Val d’Or one of the effects.

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Viola R. MacMillan (1903 – 1993)

Viola MacMillan had two careers in the Canadian mining industry. First, over a period that spanned four decades, she and her husband teamed up as prospectors and developers of several substantial mineral deposits across the country.

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John E. Hammell (1876 – 1958)

The initiative of Jack Hammell to harness the potential of the airplane opened the floodgates to mineral exploration in Canada’s north. It was Hammell’s ambition to “crack open the north,” and he did that through his pioneering use of aircraft to move men and materials to areas previously accessible only by dogsled in winter or canoe in summer.

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Arthur W. White (1911 – 1992)

Arthur White was an active mine financier who, with his partner, raised millions of dollars for more than 50 companies and was instrumental in developing several mines including two of the most prolific producers in Ontario’s Red Lake gold camp - the Campbell mine and its neighbour, which bears his name, the Arthur W. White mine.

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Sir William Logan (1798 – 1875)

Sir William Logan founded the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) in 1842 and served as its first director for 27 years. The first Canadian scientific organization, the GSC has since made a major contribution to the country’s economic growth.

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